The Turn Of The Corkscrew

I’ve already mentioned the west coast events for the Magicians Impossible book tour, but the first one is an east coast event and the one I’m looking forward to the most.

I’ll be appearing at Turn of the Corkscrew books in Rockville Centre, NY on Thursday September 14th at 7:00pm.

Turn of the Corkscrew sells books, yes, but they also serve food AND wine. As a person whose nervous about public speaking at the best of times this is either a good thing or a VERY good thing.

I’m particularly excited about this one because it’s a local event, and because Turn of the Corkscrew was the first bookstore to express any interest in inviting a first-time author out to read, sign, and talk with patrons. They’re also a great local store and local bookstores are the lifeblood of the industry.

If you’re in the NY area and can make it out, I’ll see you there. If you candy but would like a signed book you can contact them directly:

http://turnofthecorkscrew.com

 

 

 

San Diego Serenade

I’ve never been to San Diego. To be honest all I know about it is the San Diego Zoo, and the fact the climax of The Lost World: Jurassic Park (aka “Steven Spielberg’s worst film and that includes Kingdom of the Crystal Skull“) was set there.

But that all changes September 28th as I will be appearing at Mysterious Galaxy Bookstore as part of the west coast Magicians Impossible book tour.

The event kicks off at 7:30 where I’ll be reading from, answering questions about, and signing copies of Magicians Impossible. if you’re in or near SD and planning to come out, I look forward to meeting you. if you can’t make it but want a signed copy for yourself, please contact the store directly and they’ll set everything up.

See you there!

Orange Crush

More West Coast Book Tour fun! I’m appearing at Book Carnival in Orange, CA, just outside Anaheim, on September 27th at 7:30pm.

The last time I was in Anaheim would have been (gasp) 1978 or 1979, when my parents drove my sister and I down from Vancouver BC to Anaheim to meet Mickey Mouse. No trip to Disneyland this time though – this time it’s all about book stuff. If you’re in Orange and planning to attend I’ll see you there. If you can’t make it but would still like a signed copy of Magicians Impossible, please contact the good people at Book Carnival to request a copy.

More events to come!

Cruising Down Sunset

A third event has been added to the West Coast leg of the Magicians Impossible Book Tour, and it’s one I’m very excited about.

That’s right; I’ll be appearing at the legendary Book Soup Bookstore on the equally legendary Sunset Blvd.I’ll be there Tuesday, September 26th at 7pm to read from, answer questions about, and sign copies of Magicians Impossible.

Another cool thing about this event? Book Soup is right across from a music establishment of some note. You may be familiar with it:

As a big music geek you can bet I’ll be taking some pictures of the Whisky too.

If you’re in LA and are planning to come out to the event, I’ll see you there. if you can’t make it but still want a signed book, you can pre-order your book here.

More events and details to come!

Why We Write

NOTE: This is an updated version of a post I wrote five years ago, about the writing process, or at least “my” writing process. As we near the release of Magicians Impossible I wanted to revisit this piece, and add some additional flavor. 

I’m not much for talking about my “process”. There are plenty of places you can look to read about “process”, and there are plenty of people who are happy to share what their process is. They’re all interesting and informative, and also contradictory and probably of little use to you. That’s because they’re talking about their process; they aren’t talking about what process works best for you. Some insist on powering through the first draft and revising after it’s finished; others swear by revision as you go. Some obsess on word count or pages per day; others are concerned only with “good” pages. Some brave souls rise at 5am and write for three hours before starting the day proper; others write in the evenings when the day is done. Some say you need to write every day; others say weekends are fine. They’re all right … and they’re all wrong.

So here’s a piece about my process. Please feel free to ignore it.

For me it all starts with the idea. Sometimes it’s a detailed idea; other times it’s just a rough sketch. From there I think about whose story “my” story is; the characters. Male or female, child or adult – I’ll try various combinations and complications before settling on POV. From there, assuming the story I’ve put together is any good, and the characters I’ve conceived are going to be interesting enough to follow, I clear the decks, close my door and start writing. I outline before I draft, I treatment after I outline, I look for leaks and plug plot holes the best I’m able, and once that’s done, I start writing. Because if I don’t, this happens:

Pictured: What happens when you don’t plug leaks, or when your manuscript/screenplay hits an iceberg.

But before I do any of the above … I listen to music. Music may in fact be the most important part of my process. If I haven’t decided on what music I’m going to write to, chances are I won’t be able to do any writing, and what I do write will be shit.

Okay maybe not shit, but difficult.

My favorite approach to this is to assemble a playlist or mixtape to accompany whatever particular project I’m working on. This is music that gets me into “the zone”, but more importantly into the character’s heads. I’ll tailor a playlist to a specific character, and use the songs I choose to illustrate their personalities, their hopes, their fears, their everything. I’ll create several such playlists for any given project, and I’ll listen to them when I’m focusing on a particular character or subplot.

Pictured: my soundtrack

There are a couple of reasons for this. The first I already mentioned; to get into the characters and the world they inhabit. But the second is more basic; to get me going. Because some days you just … can’t … get … into … the writing part of writing.

You have lousy sleep or a lousy day. You’re at one of those points in the story where you’ve lost the plot. You want to do anything but write. Every writer has days like this. But since I started creating playlists those days are fewer and come further between.

That’s where the playlist comes in. Because you’ll sit there and you’ll listen to it, or you’ll throw it on your iPod and go for a walk, and pretty soon the story will come back to you. And once the story comes back to you, you’re able to write it down.

Now, this music doesn’t have to be of the period the project is set in; in fact I’d strongly advise against that. The reason you create a playlist is not to be authentic but to be real. To connect with the characters and the story on an emotional level. So unless you grew up listening to Civil War era grassroots music, using that music to score your Civil War era story is going to make it a dry museum piece. Ask yourself what your characters would listen to if they were alive today (and seeing as they are your characters they are alive). Would they be into rock? Punk? Country? Hip-hop? Put yourself in their headspace and assemble a list of songs that relate to them, their trials, and their troubles. See them as living, breathing people, not just words on the page and an idea in your head. Once they become “real” to you, they will be to the reader.

Some examples: my first (unpublished) novel was a murder mystery set in Renaissance Italy. It was written primarily to 60s British Invasion and 90s Britpop. There are two main characters, each with alternating perspective chapters. One was 50-something, the other a 20 year-old. Any time I was writing for the older character I lived on a steady stream of Rolling Stones, The Hollies, Manfred Mann, and the Yardbirds. For the 20 year-old, it was Blur, Oasis, Elastica, Inspiral Carpets, Happy Mondays, and so on.

Squadron, a TV series I’m developing with Copperheart Entertainment, was largely written to early 90s alternative; grunge mostly, but a lot of Pogues, Dropkick Murphys, early U2, Depeche Mode, and Duran Duran. I wanted to capture a feeling of excitement in the lives of WWI flyers, all young twenty-somethings taking to the skies to vanquish their enemies. Because a substantial portion of the story deals with the after effects of being the most famous killers in the world, I balanced fast paced rock with more introspective music for the quieter moments.

There are other examples. A suspense thriller I wrote some years back (also unsold – see the pattern?) was scored to a lot of Madchester-era music, which is appropriate given the main character has walled herself off from the world and is living in something of a nostalgia bubble. It made sense for her to be into the music she was into as a teenager, like she never grew past 2000. A thriller I wrote for a prod co about an EMT on the edge had a lot of 70s Punk in the mix – The Diodes, The Demics, The Clash, The Ramones. Music that reflects the thoughts of a main character living on the edge.

And there’s Magicians Impossible.

The Magicians Mixtape (which will be released on Spotify September 12) is pretty eclectic, featuring Metric, The Kills, The Dread Weather, T. Rex, David Bowie, The Jam, The Vaselines, XTC, The Human league … the list goes on. That playlist is distilled from about seven separate ones I created, each focusing on a major character or moment in the story. Because a novel has more working parts than a screenplay or comic book, I needed to go into greater musical depth. The end-result 50 track mix loosely follows the plot of the book and is a great accompaniment (though I recommend you listen to it after reading the book).

That all being said if your particular project is of a period where music – contemporary music – is available, use it. If there’s an emotional component also, even better. The novel I’m drafting right now features music as a major plot point; specifically one-hit wonders of the 80s and 90s. The music the main characters – all teenagers – would have grown up listening to because that was the music of their parents’ generation.

So that’s it, really. That’s my process and it probably only works for me. But maybe it’s worth a shot if you’re stuck on a plot point or something with your story that just isn’t working for you. If you can’t figure out where your character goes next, why not think about the music they would enjoy and the memories that would be associated with it?

In the end, you need to find what works best for you, and stick to that. Don’t let people like me or anybody else tell you what you’re doing is wrong because it’s not wrong; it’s right for you. As long as what you do works for you it’s better to stay on that track than try and write like someone else.

Because they can already do that. Your job is to write like you.