All Is Well As 2017 Dies

On November 11th I had my final author event of the fall at Bakka-Phoenix Bookstore in Toronto. My hometown (or as close to a hometown as I’ll ever have). It was the best attended event yet, owing to the friends, family, and colleagues who came out. I didn’t have time to talk with everyone or to thank them for coming out to support me and Magicians Impossible, but I appreciate each and every one of them.

If you missed the event, Bakka has a limited number of signed store copies they’d be happy to sell to you. There’s also a smaller number of signed copies at the Indigo Bookstore in the Eaton Centre. They make great Christmas gifts, or so I tell everyone.

So, what’s next? For Magicians? For me?

Bakka may represent the end of the fall leg of the Magicians book tour, but I’m in the process of lining up more events for 2018. These will largely be centered around the NY-NJ-CT region, but hopefully we can do some ones a bit further afield. It all depends on the book’s longevity, obviously, but there’s been a little bit of good news coming in on that front I’m not quite at liberty to discuss as of yet.

[Of course, if any bookstores, libraries, schools etc. would like to have me out for something I’m always interested, and you can reach me direct through this website]

As for me, I just finished the first draft of what will hopefully be my next novel a week ago. It was a challenge – maybe even more difficult a book than Magicians was to write – but I’m pleased with how that first draft came together. Right now it’s sitting in the drawer until 2018 when I plan to open that drawer up, pull it out, and start going over it with the red pen.

In the meantime I’m beginning development on a new TV project with some producers I have a long-standing relationship with. That was another reason for the Toronto trip; to sign the paperwork and make the deal real. It too will have to remain on the down-low for now, but it’s a project I’m very much looking forward to doing. It’s based, in part, on my own life, which is probably saying too much already. Rest assured once it’s made public a lot more about what it is will be much more clear, and may even delight some long-time fans of me and my work.

Until then I’m taking a couple of weeks off – now through Thanksgiving. 2017 has been a very busy, sometimes punishing year. between fatherhood, writing this new novel, doing Magicians promo, and inking the TV deal I’m absolutely exhausted. But I won’t be sitting idle during my Stay-cation; I have books to read, movies and TV to catch up on … and ideas to put to paper. The writer’s brain is never completely at rest, and I routinely find my best ideas when I’m not at my desk, working.

It’s been a strange journey, being an author. It’s a side of the writing biz I’ve never experienced before, but it’s been fun having the chance to step out from behind my desk to meet people, to read from my work publicly, to sign copies of a thing that sprung solely from my mind. So much of writing is solitary; even more so when you’ve largely worked in the film and television fields. Just knowing that my book is sitting on bookstore and library shelves continues to amaze me.

And I’m just getting started.

October Song

What a month.

Magicians Impossible hit stores September 12. Today is October 24. Time enough to talk a little more about it.

First up, CALIFORNIA.

Short version: I had a blast.

Longer version: I had a blast.

I also sold some books!

I got to visit (and shop at) some very cool bookstores run by some very friendly people, I got to see the sites, I got to visit places I’ve never visited before, and I of course got to do a LOT of driving. That didn’t bother me so much though; traffic in California is comparable to the sprawl and congestion of Toronto coupled with the nuttiness of New York drivers, minus the sudden unannounced stops followed by the appearance of four-way flashers (the bane of any NYC driving experience).

A few days after returning from California, I had an event at The Mysterious Bookshop in Tribeca, which went VERY well too.

Reviews also been pretty solid. People have generally liked it, with mostly three, four, five stars on Goodreads and Amazon (and a share of ones and twos) The mixed-negative reviews really don’t bother me though; if anything they make the glowing reviews more legit.

I’ve come to discover that writing a book is like building a house. Your blueprint, your specifications, your taste, number and size of rooms, amenities. It’s decorated and furnished the way you want it. It’s your house, but you did all this work for other people; your guests. They move in and inhabit the house. Some stay a few days, some for a week, some for a month. And they all have a different reaction to it. Some will like the entrance and foyer, maybe it opens up into a spectacular living room with floor to ceiling windows overlooking a lake. They’ll move through the house, room by room. Some will love the kitchen, some will think it needs more counter space. Some think the floor tiles are ugly, some don’t like the drapes. Some find the bedrooms too small, some think the bathrooms could be bigger. But in the end they all stay however long they need to and when they move out they have an impression, and an opinion. They say they liked it, but had a couple of issues. Other really liked it aside from a couple minor caveats, but they would recommend it to other friends. Some love it, and not only would they recommend it to others, they’re looking to re-up for another stay, or if you’ve got another house on the street, want to stay there too. And for some it just wasn’t what they were looking for, period.

That’s book writing. And that’s also book criticism.

An example of this is my current read is Stephen King’s It – a book I first read back in 1989, the same year as the setting of the recent blockbuster film adaptation. I was roughly the age of the characters in the book – the “Loser’s Club” of kids – and back then naturally I gravitated most strongly to the sections of the book detailing that fateful and fatal summer in Derry, Maine. The sections set in the then present-day world of 1985 with the kids all grown up were less than compelling. At that young age I had no inkling of what awaited me in the adult world. The successes, the failures, the disappointments. But reading It now it’s the adult sections that cut much deeper. Maybe because I’ve grown up as well, but all the things the adult Loser’s grapple with are things I or my friends have had to face as well.

A book is probably the most intimate form of entertainment there is, because of the time it demands. It’s not like watching a 2 hour movie or an hour long TV episode (or several, consecutively, if you’re a binge watcher), or listening to an album full of songs. A book will demand hours, days, even weeks of your time. Who you are and where you are in life will have a huge impact on how you respond to something; the fact I’ve had two very different experiences reading It would point to that.

But in the end Magicians Impossible is no longer my book; it belongs to everyone who has bought a copy. If you’re one of them, thank-you.

Now for some random bits of news:

I’ll be appearing at Bakka Phoenix Books in Toronto on Saturday November 11th at 3:00pm. Hometown store, hometown crowd; I’ve spent a lot of money at Bakka over the years, starting with their Queen St. W location in the early 1990s, so I am honored to be appearing there.

For those who missed the NY and California signings, due to time or location constraints, Turn of the Corkscrew, Book Soup, Book Carnival, Mysterious Galaxy, and The Mysterious Bookshop all have author signed copies on hand and will be happy to sell and ship them to you. Presumably, Bakka will as well, after November 11th.

And that’s pretty much it. I’m busy working on my next book, having just passed the 2/3rds mark of the first draft and am hoping to be done that by the time I depart for Toronto. It’s been going … well, though there’s a HUGE story behind it I’ll spin some day. But for now I’m just enjoying all of it; the book, authordom, the whole dang ride.

And the sunsets are nice too …

Impossible Song

This is it.

As of this writing there should be copies of Magicians Impossible sitting on the shelves of your local bookstore. If they don’t have it they’ll be more than happy to order you a copy. As of today it’s no longer my book; it belongs to the people who read it. They may like it, they may love it, and some will probably hate it because a book is its own thing and can’t be everything to everybody.

I’ve been quite busy in the lead-up to release. Interviews, podcasts, blog posts current and forthcoming. Check the new News/Media section for the latest updates to that effect.I’ll be adding them as they appear.

Magicians Impossible has a page at Goodreads as well where you can post your rating and review (and read other reviews). I’m trying not to obsessively check in to see how it’s doing, but overall people seem to be enjoying it (and the ones that are hot-and-cold still seem to like it). Regardless of how it’s received I’m proud of it. It’s the first thing I’ve ever written that feels 100% mine and mine alone. Every storytelling decision, every edit, every revision was mine to make, and I made them.

My book tour kicks off this Thursday at Turn of the Corkscrew Books in Rockville Centre, NY. I’ll be in LA the week of September 24th, with events at Book Soup, Book Carnival, and Mysterious Galaxy.

There will also be another NYC event sometime in October, date and location TBA.

I also hope to be able to announce some Canadian dates soon. We had one tentatively scheduled in Toronto during BoucherCon on October 14th but that fell through. Once a new date and locations(s) are announced you’ll find them here.

Magicians Impossible has been a very long road. I started working on it in April 2014. It’s now September 2017. Despite the release it’s not really over either; there will be lots of promotion over the weeks and months to come. but for now I’m celebrating the release. I hope you all get a chance to read it.

Let me know what you think in the comments!

 

B

Why We Write

NOTE: This is an updated version of a post I wrote five years ago, about the writing process, or at least “my” writing process. As we near the release of Magicians Impossible I wanted to revisit this piece, and add some additional flavor. 

I’m not much for talking about my “process”. There are plenty of places you can look to read about “process”, and there are plenty of people who are happy to share what their process is. They’re all interesting and informative, and also contradictory and probably of little use to you. That’s because they’re talking about their process; they aren’t talking about what process works best for you. Some insist on powering through the first draft and revising after it’s finished; others swear by revision as you go. Some obsess on word count or pages per day; others are concerned only with “good” pages. Some brave souls rise at 5am and write for three hours before starting the day proper; others write in the evenings when the day is done. Some say you need to write every day; others say weekends are fine. They’re all right … and they’re all wrong.

So here’s a piece about my process. Please feel free to ignore it.

For me it all starts with the idea. Sometimes it’s a detailed idea; other times it’s just a rough sketch. From there I think about whose story “my” story is; the characters. Male or female, child or adult – I’ll try various combinations and complications before settling on POV. From there, assuming the story I’ve put together is any good, and the characters I’ve conceived are going to be interesting enough to follow, I clear the decks, close my door and start writing. I outline before I draft, I treatment after I outline, I look for leaks and plug plot holes the best I’m able, and once that’s done, I start writing. Because if I don’t, this happens:

Pictured: What happens when you don’t plug leaks, or when your manuscript/screenplay hits an iceberg.

But before I do any of the above … I listen to music. Music may in fact be the most important part of my process. If I haven’t decided on what music I’m going to write to, chances are I won’t be able to do any writing, and what I do write will be shit.

Okay maybe not shit, but difficult.

My favorite approach to this is to assemble a playlist or mixtape to accompany whatever particular project I’m working on. This is music that gets me into “the zone”, but more importantly into the character’s heads. I’ll tailor a playlist to a specific character, and use the songs I choose to illustrate their personalities, their hopes, their fears, their everything. I’ll create several such playlists for any given project, and I’ll listen to them when I’m focusing on a particular character or subplot.

Pictured: my soundtrack

There are a couple of reasons for this. The first I already mentioned; to get into the characters and the world they inhabit. But the second is more basic; to get me going. Because some days you just … can’t … get … into … the writing part of writing.

You have lousy sleep or a lousy day. You’re at one of those points in the story where you’ve lost the plot. You want to do anything but write. Every writer has days like this. But since I started creating playlists those days are fewer and come further between.

That’s where the playlist comes in. Because you’ll sit there and you’ll listen to it, or you’ll throw it on your iPod and go for a walk, and pretty soon the story will come back to you. And once the story comes back to you, you’re able to write it down.

Now, this music doesn’t have to be of the period the project is set in; in fact I’d strongly advise against that. The reason you create a playlist is not to be authentic but to be real. To connect with the characters and the story on an emotional level. So unless you grew up listening to Civil War era grassroots music, using that music to score your Civil War era story is going to make it a dry museum piece. Ask yourself what your characters would listen to if they were alive today (and seeing as they are your characters they are alive). Would they be into rock? Punk? Country? Hip-hop? Put yourself in their headspace and assemble a list of songs that relate to them, their trials, and their troubles. See them as living, breathing people, not just words on the page and an idea in your head. Once they become “real” to you, they will be to the reader.

Some examples: my first (unpublished) novel was a murder mystery set in Renaissance Italy. It was written primarily to 60s British Invasion and 90s Britpop. There are two main characters, each with alternating perspective chapters. One was 50-something, the other a 20 year-old. Any time I was writing for the older character I lived on a steady stream of Rolling Stones, The Hollies, Manfred Mann, and the Yardbirds. For the 20 year-old, it was Blur, Oasis, Elastica, Inspiral Carpets, Happy Mondays, and so on.

Squadron, a TV series I’m developing with Copperheart Entertainment, was largely written to early 90s alternative; grunge mostly, but a lot of Pogues, Dropkick Murphys, early U2, Depeche Mode, and Duran Duran. I wanted to capture a feeling of excitement in the lives of WWI flyers, all young twenty-somethings taking to the skies to vanquish their enemies. Because a substantial portion of the story deals with the after effects of being the most famous killers in the world, I balanced fast paced rock with more introspective music for the quieter moments.

There are other examples. A suspense thriller I wrote some years back (also unsold – see the pattern?) was scored to a lot of Madchester-era music, which is appropriate given the main character has walled herself off from the world and is living in something of a nostalgia bubble. It made sense for her to be into the music she was into as a teenager, like she never grew past 2000. A thriller I wrote for a prod co about an EMT on the edge had a lot of 70s Punk in the mix – The Diodes, The Demics, The Clash, The Ramones. Music that reflects the thoughts of a main character living on the edge.

And there’s Magicians Impossible.

The Magicians Mixtape (which will be released on Spotify September 12) is pretty eclectic, featuring Metric, The Kills, The Dread Weather, T. Rex, David Bowie, The Jam, The Vaselines, XTC, The Human league … the list goes on. That playlist is distilled from about seven separate ones I created, each focusing on a major character or moment in the story. Because a novel has more working parts than a screenplay or comic book, I needed to go into greater musical depth. The end-result 50 track mix loosely follows the plot of the book and is a great accompaniment (though I recommend you listen to it after reading the book).

That all being said if your particular project is of a period where music – contemporary music – is available, use it. If there’s an emotional component also, even better. The novel I’m drafting right now features music as a major plot point; specifically one-hit wonders of the 80s and 90s. The music the main characters – all teenagers – would have grown up listening to because that was the music of their parents’ generation.

So that’s it, really. That’s my process and it probably only works for me. But maybe it’s worth a shot if you’re stuck on a plot point or something with your story that just isn’t working for you. If you can’t figure out where your character goes next, why not think about the music they would enjoy and the memories that would be associated with it?

In the end, you need to find what works best for you, and stick to that. Don’t let people like me or anybody else tell you what you’re doing is wrong because it’s not wrong; it’s right for you. As long as what you do works for you it’s better to stay on that track than try and write like someone else.

Because they can already do that. Your job is to write like you.

To Wish Impossible Things

You’re probably asking; what happened to you, man? Where you been? What happened to June? You were doing so well with the updating more frequently thing.

All true. I had planned a June update but as Ian Malcolm in Jurassic Park said, “life uh, finds a way.” Stuff happened. Work stuff. Life stuff. Book stuff, including a meeting with my agent, editor, and the marketing and publicity people at St. Martin’s Press.

We’ve all been busy. And it’s been paying off in spades:

Magicians Impossible is a mind-bending page-turner! A brilliant and unique mash-up of spells, myth and magic, once it got its claws in me I couldn’t put it down. Like a veteran stage magician, Brad Abraham has created a hip thriller that turns convention on its ear with misdirection. A must read for enthusiasts of edgy and extreme fiction.” ―Don Coscarelli, director of Phantasm, John Dies At The End

“Urban fantasy hasn’t felt this fresh – or this compulsively readable – since Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere. Abraham has conjured a pitch-perfect fever dream of myth, magic, intrigue, and pulse-pounding action, set in a vividly imagined underworld of dangerous cabals and supernatural espionage. It’s a spell you won’t want to break.” – April Snellings, author, Food Chain

“From the first sentence, Abraham pulls you in to a darkly magical, energetic world where anything can happen … and pulls the rug out from under you when you least expect it.” Rodrigo Gudino, Founder, Rue Morgue Magazine

“Crackling prose and kinetic characters make Abraham’s debut a winner.” Pierce Brown, NY Times best-selling author, Red Rising

“A thrilling novel brimming with memorable characters!” — Jason M. Hough, NYT bestselling author of Zero World

“An action-packed, thrilling fantasy with surprises around every corner and behind every door!” Erika Lewis, author, Game of Shadows

“Part hard-boiled thriller, part magical mayhem, Magicians Impossible is a page-turning adventure where the stakes are high and the magic is mind-blowing. It’s urban fantasy at its very best.” – Lisa Maxwell, NYT bestselling author of The Last Magician

From the first page, Brad Abraham’s Magicians Impossible is a high-wire act that doesn’t let up the excitement for even a paragraph. Simply put, Magicians Impossible is a book I wish I’d written.” – Libby Cudmore, Author of The Big Rewind

Those are the blurbs, and I want to thank each and every one of these immensely talented writers and artists who took the time out of their busy schedules to read my work and say nice things about it.

I’ve known Don Coscarelli almost 20 years now, and he took time out of a very busy spring when he was working on both Phantasm Ravager and the 4K restoration of Phantasm with JJ Abrams to read the book.

I’ve known Rod Gudino almost as long, and was hired by him to write for his then brand new magazine called Rue Morgue – a gig I stuck with for over ten years.

Through Rue Morgue I met the immensely talented April Snellings who has continued her involvement in helping my career along, encouraging me to join International thriller Writers alongside her and so many other talented authors.

I don’t even know Pierce Brown, but this NYT bestselling author was gracious enough to read and blurb the book anyway.

I met both Erika Lewis (my “book-mate” at St. Martins Press) and Lisa Maxwell (who just became a NY Times bestselling author) through Twitter, and they were both kind enough to carve out some time to read the book as well. Erika’s Game of Shadows and Lisa’s The Last Magician are in bookstores now.

Last but most certainly not least is Libby Cudmore; mixtape enthusiast, journalist extraordinaire, and author of The Big Rewind. We’ve had many an interaction online and by email over the last while ans I’m especially thrilled to have her endorsement on the book.

As a creative person you really stand on the shoulders of giants.Please click on the links, visit their websites, and buy their books/movies/magazines.

As far as Magicians Impossible is concerned, here’s some excerpts from the first reviews:

“From its action-packed opening [Magicians Impossible] is a cinematic, fast-paced debut.” – Library Journal (STARRED Review)

“An amusing and captivating adventure.” – Book List (STARRED review)

So that’s been happening, as has the planning of a certain author book tour happening this fall. That’s still coming together but here’s what’s happening as of right now.

September 14th, I will be appearing at Turn of the Corkscrew Books and Wine in Rockville Centre, New York.

I’ll be at Book Carnival in Orange, CA, just outside Anaheim, on September 27th.

September 28th, I will be at Mysterious Galaxy in San Diego, CA.

As far as Canadian dates, right now my publicist is setting up an in-store in Toronto. No firm date yet, but I will be in Toronto the week of October 9-13 for Bouchercon, so expect something around then. It’s a hometown crowd, so I’m very excited to see who shows up.

There’ll also be various events through the fall, most likely sticking to the Northeast. This will included an appearance at SMP’s booth at New York Comic-Con.

If you own/manage a bookstore and are interested in hosting an appearance you can contact me directly through this website (info in my bio).

And of course, Magicians Impossible arrives in bookstores September 12, 2017. You can order it at fine bookstores everywhere.